Wednesday, 3 May 2006

White collars

Not all the readers of Other Men's Flowers are living in Spain under an assumed name or are wanted for questioning in connection with serious crimes. A few are captains of industry, senior statesmen, noted intellectuals or distinguished academics.
One of the latter, an American professor of law, is also a writer whose latest book, Lying, Cheating, and Stealing has recently been published by Oxford University Press; it has been described as “a long-needed and path-breaking consideration of white-collar crime from the perspective of a top-notch legal scholar.”
An accomplished and well-researched treatise, it is also a fascinating read, equally informed by American and British approaches to criminal law theory. However, the kind of people described in the first sentence above will be disappointed if its title leads them to imagine that it contains useful hints of special interest to them: it is not a “How To…” book.

[One of the high profile cases analysed in the book is that of Jeffrey Archer, which is of particular interest to UK readers and fans of his rotten novels. Lying, Cheating and Stealing is one of the series of Oxford Monographs on Criminal Justice; sadly for impecunious law students, this series is not included in the Oxford Reference Library which is available free online in the UK as described here].

4 comments:

Minerva said...

Not all the readers of Other Men's Flowers are living in Spain under an assumed name or are wanted for questioning in connection with serious crimes. A few are captains of industry, senior statesmen, noted intellectuals or distinguished academics.

I wish!

Tony said...

Welcome back, Min.
I'm always pleased to have comments from distinguished academics.

doris said...

"Not all the readers of Other Men's Flowers are living in Spain under an assumed name or are wanted for questioning in connection with serious crimes. A few are captains of industry, senior statesmen, noted intellectuals or distinguished academics."

Maybe you can count me in too! ;-)

Tony said...

Well, maybe, Doris, but I'm not sure I know you well enough.